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Category: Lean

In Lean and Intentional Living, the path to improvement is lined with discomfort

Change often comes with discomfort, even change for the better. Our minds are comfortable with the status quo and reluctant to forge ahead into known obstacles and discomfort. If we focus on WHY we want to change and fix our gaze to the horizon where our ambitions hover, we can see that discomfort is merely a necessary part of following the path to true north.

Lean is not an “off-the shelf” commodity

No one’s going to buy an improvement program just because a version of it works for someone else. Here lies the misconception. If someone has to sell you an improvement program, you’re probably not ready for it.

Intentional Living – Knowing is not doing when it comes to life and process change

We can quickly find ourselves slipping from a position of motivation when the going gets rough. Like many others I’m sure, I find inspiration in reading just one more blog or researching just one more cutting edge idea. Unfortunately, putting awesome information into my brain does not directly result in putting one foot in front of the other when it comes to getting off the couch and getting active.

Improve your 5S culture by lowering your standards

By setting a perfect standard we can sometimes make the standard impossible to realise. It's much better to set a realistic standard that requires some improvement to achieve but doesn't necessarily ask for perfection all at once.

Lean Leadership – The obligation to empower

To these leaders, the message is simple. If we waited for others to be doing improvement as a condition for us to do improvement, we would never do improvement. We can only improve ourselves and our own processes and set an example for others. How do we encourage others to improve? By setting the example.

Minimalist Lean – Build a waste elimination culture in seven simple steps

In reality, it’s very simple to build a waste elimination culture. The principles are not difficult to grasp, the process is low cost and doesn’t require years of training. The most important principle to remember is that building a waste elimination culture is more about the culture than the waste elimination.